Curbed – Checking In: 33-Story South Park Building Will Be Fancy Corporate Housing

March 3rd, 2015

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The 33-story tower at 888 S. Olive St. in South Park is going to be doing something a little different than the other condo and apartment towers in the neighborhood. The project, just named Level DTLA, will be full of extended-stay rentals aimed at “upscale guests, Hollywood’s elite, and both local and international leisure and business travelers,” according to a release for the building. Vancouver-based developer Onni Group has spent $ 200 million to build the tower, which features 300 one-, two-, and three-bedroom suites that begin at 710 square feet and go up to 2,035 square feet.

Would any high-end, extended-stay complex be without amenities? This one will have a rooftop pool, a 37,000-square-foot, fourth-floor amenity space, and, for all those business travelers, 5,000 square feet of meeting space; there’s also groundfloor retail planned. All this is going to have a hefty pricetag: rents are expected to start at $ 5,000 a month, says the LA Times. So, use that sauna every day, renters—you definitely paid for it. Level DTLA is scheduled to open in the summer of 2015, and Onni’s got plans for two more towers in DTLA after that.

This is apparently a new trend falling somewhere between luxury rentals and high-end Airbnbs: Hollywood’s huge mixed-use Columbia Square project will have extended-stay rooms, and new owners at Franklin Village’s Villa Carlotta are kicking out tenants to convert that historic building to extended-stay.

· 888 Olive [Curbed LA]

Curbed LA

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4 Sale – 3358 Hamilton Way, Los Angeles, CA 90026, $1,850,000 7 beds, 6 baths

March 2nd, 2015

4490 sqft, 7 beds, 6 baths, single-family home in Los Angeles, CA – Silver Lake
Trulia Real Estate Search – Los Angeles

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Curbed – Goin’ Out West: Californians Seriously Only Live Here For the Weather, Beaches

March 2nd, 2015

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December in LA via Lucy Rendler-Kaplan / Curbed LA flickr pool

California voters feel that future generations of Californians will have it much worse than they do and hate the congestion, traffic, and high cost of housing that are already here, but still love the state and would rather live here than anywhere else, shows the latest USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll. “[M]ore than 7 in 10 voters said they would rather live in California than anywhere else, with 47 percent agreeing ‘strongly’ with that statement,” says a release about the poll’s findings. The most common reason for California love? The fantastic weather and the beach, of course.

69 percent of poll respondents (randomly sampled registered California voters) chose the climate, the beaches, and the coast as the best thing about California. “Most Californians have decided that they are willing to pay a ‘weather tax‘ to live here,” says the poll’s director, who is also the executive director of the Unruh Institute of Politics of USC.

Second best, with a distant 18 percent, was “friends/family/the people,” which is curious because that’s kind of similar to the most hated Golden State attribute: 24 percent of voters say that Cali is overcrowded, the traffic is bad, and that there are waaay too many people. (In LA County—the nation’s most populous—34 percent feel this is the worst thing about living in California.)

And it’s not going to get any better as time goes on, many poll participants feel. 56 percent of voters respond that they think this generation of voters has it worse than previous generations, and 42 percent that the next generation will have to deal with an even worse California. But despite that, only about one in four voters say they’re more likely to move to another state now than they were in the past, and 46 percent say there’s no real difference in their plans to move away between now and the past. So even though all the bad things about California are, by their accounts, only getting worse, they’re sticking to it because it’s beautiful and warm.
· What’s the California Dream? Sunshine [USC Dornsife]

Curbed LA

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Curbed – New to Market: Century-Old Craftsman Bungalow Court in the Hollywood Hills Asking $5MM

March 2nd, 2015

The Hollywood Hills sure are full of surprises, aren’t they? Take for instance this charming compound of Craftsman-style bungalows tucked away in the hills near the Magic Castle that’s just hit the market. The gated complex dates all the way back to 1912, and contains six stand-alone cottages within its bucolic .39-acre grounds. Ranging in size from one to three bedrooms, the rustic cottages feature hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, crown moldings, and fireplaces. Per the listing, the units have been “upgraded and well maintained” while “retaining their original authenticity.” Each one has its own washer and dryer, and all but the smallest unit come with a garage. If this property sounds kinda dreamy, well, here comes the wake-up call: the units are under rent-control, and the asking price is $ 4.995 million.

· 1908 HILLCREST Rd [Redfin]

Curbed LA

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4 Sale – 724 W 110th St, Los Angeles, CA 90044, $333,000 3 beds, 1 bath

March 2nd, 2015

1596 sqft, 3 beds, 1 bath, single-family home in Los Angeles, CA – 90044
Trulia Real Estate Search – Los Angeles

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Curbed – Micro Week 2015: How 7 Tiny-Home-Dwellers Learned to Love Micro-Living

March 1st, 2015

Welcome to Curbed’s first-ever Micro Week, five days’ worth of stories, photos, and minuscule floorplans that celebrate the grand tradition of small-space living. We’ll tour small homes, explore the city’s smallest neighborhood, and so much more!
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Photos by Wonho Frank Lee

All Micro Week we’ve been showing you small homes of all varieties. Have you been inspired to downsize yet? We’ve been asking all of our gracious hosts and some other residents of tiny homes about the HOW of micro-living, and it all comes down to one thing: Simplify, simplify, simplify…

In order to downsize, everyone told us some version of, “If you haven’t used it in a year, get rid of it.” If you never have dinner guests, do you really need eight sets of dinnerware? How about all of those pairs of jeans? Do you ever watch those DVDs anymore? (Does anyone watch DVDs anymore?)

Dawn, who has a 380-square-foot apartment in South Park, gave us a really unique answer: Try having a Packing Party. (In fact, it might be worth doing even if you’re not planning to move.) Basically, box up everything you own—dishes, clothes, books, everything—and mark the boxes clearly so you can find whatever you’re looking for. Over the next three weeks, take out of the boxes only what you need. You may be surprised how much stuff is still boxed up after three weeks.

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When it comes to decorating your new place, Tom and Emily, who have a tiny cabin up in Deer Lodge Park, say you have more space than you realize, just think about it in a different way: hooks, bags, magnetic surfaces, stacking, etc.

Michael and Kate, who have a bungalow in Larchmont Village, echoes the same idea: There’s lots of stuff out there designed to make your space more efficient: everything from pull-out couches to pocket doors to closet organizers to under-bed storage containers. (Multiple people said to check out the Container Store.)

If you like to entertain guests, Dominic, who has a 750-square-foot Bungalow near Pico and Sierra Bonita, says hosting hasn’t changed at all for him. He’s got a great courtyard and friendly neighbors, so he still hosts dinner parties and barbecues. Plus, it’s got a firepit, which is great for making s’mores.

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Everyone we talked to said they wouldn’t go back to regular-sized living. Natasia appreciated that the move forced her to define her priorities. She found herself asking concrete questions like, “Would I prefer more room to move around easily, or a large comfy bed to sleep in at night? Do I value working from home or having a dedicated space to eat? Will I be willing to live with a bathroom sink full of dirty dishes if it meant having a hot meal every day?”

Moving into a smaller space made everyone less stressed and meant they wouldn’t spend money on extra stuff they didn’t need. (Not to mention there rent is generally lower.)

And then there’s the one final perk Dawn mentioned: “Sometimes I walk in the door and think, ‘Well, when I get hit by that bus … there’s gonna be very little clean-up.’” Leonard Hyman
· Micro Week 2015 [Curbed LA]
· Touring a 272-Square-Foot, Cleverly DIYed Apartment in Palms [Curbed LA]
· Tour a 930-Square-Foot Dream Bungalow in Larchmont Village [Curbed LA]
· How to Move From Hollywood to a 360-Square-Foot Cabin in the San Bernardino Mountains [Curbed LA]

Curbed LA

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4 Sale – 819 E 97th St, Los Angeles, CA 90002, $399,900 5 beds, 3 baths

March 1st, 2015

1954 sqft, 5 beds, 3 baths, single-family home in Los Angeles, CA – 90002
Trulia Real Estate Search – Los Angeles

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